Have you read it? Review it!

If you have already read Between Two Kingdoms and enjoyed it, one of the best ways to spread the word at this time is to write a review on Amazon or CBD.

Check out our first review on Amazon by Charles Schierbeck:

It is hard to know how to cast Joe Boyd’s book. I think the category of allegory is correct, however, at times I think that parable might be the better word. Rather, a string of parables woven into one longer story. What makes this nice is that you can read the book one chapter at a time, as a sort of devotional, or just plop down on the sofa and get lost in it for a whole night. I’d like to reread it with a group. It is that sort of book that you would want to read with friends and discuss.

The biggest thing I got out of the book was the authors concept of the upper kingdom. As I first read the book I was trying to figure out if the upper kingdom represented heaven or the church. Then I realized that there is no real distinction between the two. The upper kingdom is the “church as we see her spread out through all time and space and rooted in eternity” (CS Lewis, Screwtape Letters). I understood this concept, that the church is God’s attempt to bring his kingdom into the world. However, when I finally made the connection in the book it was a shock to my system just how much I had separated the two in my real life. It is perhaps a little sad that I have not thought of the church the way it is presented in this book.

The title of my review is perhaps a bit lofty. It would be hard for me to place any book in the company of Lewis, Sayers, Tolkein, or Williams. Of the group only Lewis is really comparable, as none of the others wrote allegory. While “B2K” might not rank with the best of Lewis’ work it is at least as good as if not better than his lesser works (such as Pilgrims Regress). The reason for the title is that the author is clearly influenced by these authors in the same way that Lewis was influenced by MacDonald and Chesterton. He is a good student of these masters. So, if you like Lewis’ allegory, “Hinds’ Feet on High Places”, by Hanna Hurnard, or “Phantastes” by George MacDonald; then you should add this book to your reading list.

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